Risk Management



Texas Consent Requirements Effective 2020

The Texas Medical Disclosure Panel (TMDP) revised the Disclosure and Consent for Medical Care and Surgical Procedures Rules and Regulations: Texas HHS Rules and Regulations.

Effective January 1, 2020, Texas physicians should use the new informed consent form for patients undergoing 9 ophthalmic procedures (see List A below).

The Texas specific consent form should be used in combination with the OMIC procedure specific consent form.

The new Texas consent forms can be downloaded from the Texas HHS website.

English: Texas Consent Requirements in English

Spanish: Texas Consent Requirements in Spanish

List A: 9 eye treatments and procedures that require specific risks listed on Texas specific consent form listed below or go to the following link: Direct Link to List A

(f) Eye treatments 

(1) Eye muscle surgery.

(A) Additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Double vision.

(C) Partial or total blindness.

(2) Surgery for cataract with or without implantation of intraocular lens.

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Need for glasses or contact lenses.

(C) Complications requiring the removal of implanted lens.

(D) Partial or total blindness.

(3) Retinal or vitreous surgery.

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Recurrence or spread of disease.

(C) Partial or total blindness.

(4) Reconstructive and/or plastic surgical procedures of the eye and eye region, such as blepharoplasty, tumor, fracture, lacrimal surgery, foreign body, abscess, or trauma.

(A) Blindness.

(B) Nerve damage with loss of use and/or feeling to eye or other areas of face.

(C) Painful or unattractive scarring.

(D) Worsening or unsatisfactory appearance.

(E) Dry eye.

(5) Photocoagulation and/or cryotherapy.

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Pain.

(C) Partial or total blindness.

(6) Corneal surgery, such as corneal transplant, refractive surgery and pterygium.

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Pain.

(C) Need for glasses or contact lenses.

(D) Partial or total blindness.

(7) Glaucoma surgery by any method.

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Worsening of the glaucoma.

(C) Pain.

(D) Partial or total blindness.

(8) Removal of the eye or its contents (enucleation or evisceration).

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Worsening or unsatisfactory appearance.

(C) Recurrence or spread of disease.

(9) Surgery for penetrating ocular injury, including intraocular foreign body.

(A) Complications requiring additional treatment and/or surgery.

(B) Possible removal of eye.

(C) Pain.

(D) Partial or total blindness.

List B: 3 eye treatments and procedures that do not require a Texas specific consent form listed below or go to the following link: Direct Link to List B

(f) Eye procedures that do not require a TX specific consent form

(1) Administration of topical, parenteral (such as IV), or oral drugs or pharmaceuticals, including, but not limited to, fluorescein angiography, orbital injection or periocular injections.

(2) Removal of extraocular foreign bodies.

(3) Chalazion excision.

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